Myers Lab

Myers

Mission


Our research mission is to improve the human condition by discovery through research on means to prevent, cure, and lessen the burden of vascular disease, and provide an arena to train DVM’s, M.D.’s, Ph.D.’s, medical and post-doctoral research fellows, clinicians, graduate students and undergraduates alike.”

About Daniel Myers

Dr. Myers received his DVM degree from Tuskegee University in May 1997, and completed his comparative medicine training in 2001 at the University of Michigan.  Dr. Myers received his Masters of Public Health in hospital and molecular epidemiology in 2003 from the University of Michigan.  He is a Diplomat of The American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.  Dr. Myers has a joint appointment with the Department of Surgery and the Unit of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ULAM, http://medicine.umich.edu/medschool/research/office-research/unit-laboratory-animal-medicine-ulam/contact-ulam/ulam-faculty/myers-jr-daniel-d).  Currently Dr. Myers is Director of the Conrad Jobst Vascular Research Laboratories, University of Michigan and is nationally recognized for his expertise in translational animal model development. 

Our Research

Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) has a national morbidity exceeding 900,000 persons, with approximately 300,000 fatalities annually. Translational animal models can help accelerate our defining mechanisms to facilitate limiting vascular inflammation and thrombosis. The Myers Laboratory studies and evaluates novel therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of deep venous thrombosis.  We use in vivo and molecular methods to study therapeutic drug response to lessen venous disease pathogenesis  Our group engages interdisciplinary collaborations within and outside of the U-M, for the extrapolation of pre-clinical research findings to develop new preventative and therapeutic strategies for patients.


Current Research Interest

Ø  Translational Animal Models of Vascular Disease

Ø  Sex Differences and Aging during Venous Thrombosis

Ø  Selectin Biology and Cancer Metastasis during Venous Thrombosis

Ø  Metabolomic Mechanisms of Venous Thrombosis